touchdown

The Touchdown Recruiter – How to avoid the pitfalls of the obnoxious interviewer

I really enjoy attending interviews and being on the other side of the fence. Its character building and can also keep you humble about the recruitment process and what it feels like to be a candidate. As human resources professionals we can easily forget what it’s like to be a job seeker in a highly intensive market place.

In my book, How to Find a Job in 6 Weeks, I discuss the various recruitment techniques used by recruiters and how to best prepare for success. However, one style that I have not discussed is the Touchdown Method. It’s not a revelation and it has been around for a while, however, what makes this style stand out recently is that it’s becoming common place among many recruiters and those people that make recruitment decisions.

The touchdown method is very simple; fail to impress in the first 5 minutes and consider your interview done and dusted. Recruiters have become very skillful at winding up the interview to the point it’s obvious to the candidate. Is it a lack of respect for the candidate? Time restraints and pressure to meet objectives and measures or just plain lack of sympathy altogether for people?

I certainly encountered this recruitment approach more often that I would have cared for and I consider myself to be very well versed at interview performance.

I always compare the Touchdown Recruiter and their approach to interviewing with performance in sport. In most matches a game is not won in the first 5 minutes. Whether it’s a try in rugby or an early goal in soccer, you cannot assume that the team is going to outperform for the rest of the match and be the winner. There is the second half to contend with or another 80 minutes of play. Some players take longer to adjust to the tactics of the other team on the day or require some direction by the coach to bring out their specific talents in an advantageous way.

Have recruiters become inpatient in looking for an early win? Are they short cutting candidates prematurely? What dangers does this bring to selecting the best candidate for the job and opportunities lost?

If you are a job seeker reading this article it’s about awareness and preparation. Although I don’t subscribe to this method of recruitment, the reality is it exists, and I can’t change the attitude of these recruiters. I can also guarantee you will become a victim of the Touchdown Recruiter at some point during your job search.

Here are some tips to prepare yourself to navigate your way through this process and avoid a touchdown;

  1. Prepare a compelling introduction about yourself that is no longer than 5 minutes
  2. It must be a snapshot of your career to date, progression from studies to work and the evolution to your current job
  3. It’s should contain key highlights of specialization and successes specific to the position you have applied and the key competencies required
  4. Consider it a 5 minute storyboard of yourself, what you stand for and your career aspirations

That’s a handful in 5 minutes and it takes preparation. Start with your resume and draft a paragraph consisting of your career objective and career summary that will help construct your introduction.  The next step is to practice it aloud with a friend and refine your delivery by checking the timing and impact of your introduction. It should show confidence and be compelling. Be crisp and straight to the point, and don’t overstate or over talk your introduction.

Capture these points well and the Touchdown Recruiter will progress you to the next phase of the recruitment process. Be patient with yourself and don’t expect too much at the first introduction during a real interview, its takes time and practice to become confident in your delivery. Continue reading

Bored panel of judges or interviewers

7 signs you’re on the way out at the interview…

We have all experienced it…just walked out of a job interview with an empty feeling…what on Earth has happened here?

You are not alone…interviews are a dynamic process…like a growing organism that changes indefinitely…not really knowing what it will metamorphosis into. However, nature has given us a tool called the gut feeling and we all have it within us to feel our way through an interview. Some are naturally gifted at recognising the cues at an interview and some take a little longer to grasp it….but if you can tune into it…then it’s a great barometer of interview success.

Here are some cues I think you will find useful in determining your gut feel during a job interview that are most common with recruiters…even the better ones give it away!

  1. The recruiters eyes start to wander off into the never-never and there is alack of interest…preferring to look at an ugly print on the wall instead.
  2. The recruiter appears to be distracted by text messages on his phone…what on Earth must be so important they can’t put the phone away?
  3. One of the recruiters sends a signal to the other recruiter to wind it up…a kick under the table or a secret comment or code appears to have been ingeniously executed..they must think we are stupid and have not noticed!
  4. You are not asked about your salary expectations or notice period…and that is because they don’t like you and it’s not important anymore.
  5. There is no subtle banter or laughter around the table…its strictly business…and lets get this process out-of-the-way and move onto the next candidate.
  6. The interview has been cut short to a point where it is not possible to make an assessment any longer…in which case it was not really an interview in the first place but a tick the box to show the successful candidate was selected from a short-list.
  7. The recruiter has wound up the interview by informing you…we have more candidates to interview next week and will determine fit after that and come back to you with the outcome…oh really…you may as well tell the candidate they are out of the process and not inflate their optimism!

So next time you’re at a job interview and you’re feeling you’re on the way out…you are probably right! Move on and use it as an experience…there is sure to be another interview around the corner.

prepared interview

10 killer job interview questions that will knock you out!

It’s unfair to provide you with an encyclopedia of interview questions and expect you to become proficient in their use without overloading you with information. This is not productive, particularly when our objective is to get you to adapt to interviewers and a range of interview questions.

It’s unlikely that memorising answers to 100 interview questions will get you through the interview process. At interviews, you must be able to think clearly and adapt and modify your responses quickly rather than respond verbatim.

The following sample questions will assist you in answering a range of generic interview questions that are not necessarily behaviour based. This list is not meant to be exhaustive and it is likely you will encounter questions not mentioned in this book. The point is that authors of books that detail every question conceivable are doing you a disservice. I am more concerned about your ability to think on your feet, to expect the unexpected, and then to be able to answer that question to the best of your ability.

I know this is easier said than done because it requires composure, confidence, a rational thought process and experience of interviews. However, this can be managed with practice and interview experience. Seek to attend as many interviews as possible to practice your responses and to learn from them each time. You will find that you will grow in confidence with each occasion and become more adaptable at interviews. Practice with friends and family if possible.

Here are 10 killer questions to get you started;

1. What have you been criticised for in the past four years?
Reply: Provide an answer that is not so serious or trivial that it will disqualify you.
‘I offered some ideas I thought were constructive but was told not to rock the boat.’

2. Did you agree or disagree with the criticism and why?
Reply: ‘Agreeing with some of the criticism is a better response than agreeing with none of it at all.’

3. Where would you like to be in five years?
Reply: ‘I’d like to be in your job.’

4. How do you expect to get there?
Reply: Be clear and specific as to how you will meet the requirements and responsibilities to your career plan. Avoid common answers like ‘hard work’ and ‘attending courses’.

5. What would you like to change in this job to make it ideal?
Reply: ‘I don’t think it should be changed, I do think it has to be mastered and that is a challenging and exciting opportunity.’

6. How would you describe the most or least ideal boss you worked for?
Reply: ‘I can adapt to any style, particularly to someone who can give me enough directions, so I have a specific idea of what’s expected from me and then enough restraint not to hover over me every step of the way.’

7. What activities in your position do you enjoy most?
Reply: This question is designed to reveal your dislikes. The interviewer will make reference to the opposite of your answer when describing the activities you enjoy most. The best way to answer this question is think about how the activities you enjoy most can reveal your dislikes. You can do this by simply applying the opposite to your answer. For example, the opposite of ‘being part of a team’ is ‘bad morale’.

8. How would you describe yourself in three adjectives?
Reply: Combine your answer to convey strengths in both ability and personality such as: determined, likable, and successful.

9. How would your subordinates and peers describe you with three adjectives?
Reply: Answer with the same as for question 8 and smile.

10. What would you do if you detected a peer falsifying expense records?
Reply: ‘Report it’.

In my next article I will unleash the next 10 killer questions that will knock you out for six during the interview…

Are you caught up in a job transition wormhole…

 

wormhole

A wormhole is a theoretical passage through space-time that could create shortcuts for long journeys across the universe. Wormholes are predicted by the theory of general relativity. But be wary: wormholes bring with them the dangers of sudden collapse, high radiation and dangerous contact with exotic matter.

The whole product space for career transition and job search services can be daunting. With so many off the shelf and overpriced products on the market in a variety of offers, you could be excused for thinking it’s overwhelming. Just about everyone in the recruitment and human resources business seem to have a career outplacement, job transition or career planning system that will help navigate your journey through the unknown void of a job wormhole. Nobody really knows what is on the other side of a wormhole and career transition is one of those services that can not guarantee an outcome or result for every individual.

When I wrote my book, How to Find a Job in 6 Weeks, I did so with the view that job search is about your life in a practical sense. With this in mind I focused on the everyday person and the challenges we face with every day life. Very few people can afford to put their career on hold for three to six months and go through an in-depth exploration of their career options. Some call it a sabbatical and others a career break, either way, the financial backing required to support such a notion are beyond most people.That is because for the majority of people we have families to support, responsibilities, bills to pay and the mortgage. When we lose our job we need to get back to work soon and continue to derive a steady income. In fact, if you surveyed 50 people who have lost their job right now and you ask them what they want to achieve with their career, 95% will tell they want to get back to work as soon as possible. Very few will tell you they want to embark on a long term career exploration and wait for the right time to re-enter the workforce.

A successful job search systems needs to be;

  1. Practical in its application and execution
  2. Understand the realities of every day life challenges
  3. Affordable to the majority of people
  4. Not time-consuming or overbearing
  5. Deliver a high impact in a relative short period of time

So how do you create a model for job transition that achieves that? You simply put a reasonable time frame on it…I did so with the 6 week job search system. People are their most enthusiastic in the first 6 weeks of job search with a lot of energy and positive feelings about their future. If we harness that energy with some practical job search tools and provide an effective toolkit….most people will be successful in achieving their new job relatively soon. The 6 week job search time frame is a guide and should not be generalised as a one size fits all solution…its also not a guarantee. The system has been effective it practically putting people on the right track with a level of enthusiasm, committeemen and confidence. The 6 week system is a target, guide, benchmark for success and something to strive for.

There are 5 key critical success factors that make the 6 week job search system effective when transitioning into another job. It represents the toolkit of knowledge everyone should be competent with:

  1. Successful job search skills knowledge
  2. Strong financial management initiatives
  3. Flexible and open career re-assessment
  4. Mental toughness and a strong belief system
  5. Managing your current job.

To learn more about the 6 week job search system follow the link below to a dynamic PowerPoint slide;

http://www.authorstream.com/Presentation/jobwebco-1643043-find-job-6-weeks-presentation/

 

How becoming a maze runner improved my job search…

maze 1

Most of us have seen the movie Maze Runner…young boys pitted in a futuristic experiment where they are conditioned to fear the maze. They are gripped by obstacles, threats and unrelenting fear to navigate  a maze that would eventually take them to the other side, and free them from their current surreal incarceration…and so the the story goes.

So what has this got to do with job search…have I completely lost my marbles and my expertise in practical job search techniques? Just stick to the routine I hear you say…keep with the script!

In my book, How to Find a Job in 6 Weeks, I discuss managing the myriad of employment agencies and their respective consultants during your job search. Just like another famous movie western, The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, it’s precisely what your going to encounter. Some employment agencies and their consultants are terrific at managing the relationship with applicants…and some are just plain terrible.

There are reasons for such a diversity in the level of service…and it comes down to one thing only…care factor. The better employment agencies care about you as a person and also help manage your career aspirations. They understand they are dealing with an important and sensitive issue around your professional and career advancement. Looking for a job can effect family, income and social status along the way. Dealing emphatically with these needs rather than just a name on an application form is what makes the difference. Some of the excuses you hear are centered around time versus effort and reward. That is, employment consultants can’t respond to every applicant personally because they are time poor and don’t have the resources. They need to get top candidates in front of clients quickly and strike while the irons hot… so they can make commission. It’s an economic reality driven by highly incentivised agents and the pressures associated with hitting targets. Understanding this reality will help you better manage your job search so that you don’t get too frustrated with the lack of care and attention you may receive as you navigate the job search maze.

On the flip side, the are employment agencies that manage the job search process much better and will dedicate some time in assisting with your career aspirations. They understand every candidate is a marketing prospect and a potential client in the future. They are just not spending time with you for the sake of it…they are fully aware of the future benefits of a satisfied job seeker with their business. In some cases, I have met employment consultants that really care about you as a person and genuinely try to provide whatever assistance they can to help you achieve you objective.

maze 2

So what does this mean to you as a job seeker? Here are some tips to help you manage your aspirations when dealing with employment agencies:

  1. Choose employment agencies you want to deal with when registering for work that are closer aligned with your values and career expectations…employment agencies compete heavily for recruitment assignments that are often outsourced by companies to multiple agencies
  2. Understand that not one employment agency has a monopoly on the job market or sector, and they don’t have a bucket load of jobs to tap into
  3. You should seek feedback after you have invested time in a recruitment process and been unsuccessful…you may be denied feedback…however, you have a right to some clarity if you can get it because it will assist your learning and help you develop your job search skills
  4. Unless you have been treated unfairly and there have been breaches to your rights…if you have not had a good experience, just move on and don’t let it get to you as more opportunities will present themselves in the future.
  5. Build good relationships with employment consultants that share your values and are prepared to respect and assist you along the way.

Employment agencies…friend or foe? As you navigate the job search maze and just like the maze runner…there is a new beginning when you finally get there. Keep your spirits up and focus on overcoming the obstacles in front of you in the best way you can. Job search is a temporary process and eventually we all find jobs and move onto the next chapter in our career.

 

Personal Resume

About your resume…so who are you really?

I often get asked the question, “How much effort should I put into my resume to make it more personal?”

It’s a really good question because there are personal traits about us that get missed in resumes. Too often resumes are written in such a boring and bland manner, focusing solely on high work achievements and strong occupational skills, forgetting to portray who you really are. So who are you really? Everyone has a different side to them and that is what makes us different. Sometimes the workplace culture puts you in an environment where it creates, an artificial you. We are playing a part, trying to fit-in, and modelling to suite the perfect organisational fit. However, does it come naturally to you and if I met you jogging on the beach, is that how you would present yourself…your true self?

There are three events that occur with your resume when applying for a job that may impact on your personal profile;

  1. Not all recruiters care about you personal achievements and some may not even read the last page of your resume where usually your personal achievements, hobbies and other interests are noted
  2. Whether a recruiter will spend time reviewing the personal achievements on your resume will depend on the volume of recruitment they are processing  and the type of job you have applied for
  3. Personal traits come into play further down the track when you are at the shortlist stage and when the hiring manager imposes his views and values around the candidate in trying to determine fit for the organisation.

My approach to resume writing is to note personal high achievements in your resume for a number of reason. They provide a snap shot of who you are outside of work, your values and what you stand for. It may provide an insight into the person that we often don’t see in a controlled workplace culture…who you really are.

Resume

So what are good examples of personal high achievements? They can be a number of things and there is no limit. The only rule to observe is that the personal achievement must be significant enough to get noticed and normally related to a milestone achieved in the community and outside of work.

  • Are you the president or secretary of a successful sporting organisation that competes at the highest level in its code
  • Have you published a book and have achieved status as an author
  • Do you compete at a high level representing your State or Country in sport or any other activity
  • Have you been involved in missionary or voluntary work to support the disadvantaged, whether at home or outside your country
  •  Have you raised money for charity that attracted media attention for your efforts
  • Have you received an honor or merit from Government and been recognized for a significant achievement to the community

There is much more I could add to this list as long as it follows the golden rule that the personal achievement must be significant enough to be noticed. So be creative and don’t be afraid to list your significant personal achievements on your resume. We are not just creatures of our work based environment and organisational cultures but also real people with our own unique personalities, belief systems and values. That’s what makes us who we are.

5 Things to Tell Your Friends about Job Hunting…

 

5 critical success 2

5 critical success factors

Let me provide you with a reality check and a quick snap shot on the fundamentals around job search. Yes, everyone in the career and recruitment game has a theory or a view around the key steps to finding a job.  I have read most of them and I find them to be much the same with slight variations. The following are the foundations mentioned in my book that were developed through my own personal experience.  I can break it down into 5 key critical success factors:

  1. Successful job search skills knowledge
  2. Strong financial management initiatives
  3. Flexible and open career re-assessment
  4. Mental toughness and a strong belief system
  5. Managing your current job.

Successful Job Search Skills Knowledge

Key Success Factor Number 1

Your very first objective when you have lost your job is to get another job. Now that may sound a bit straightforward but it isn’t. To get another job today requires special knowledge and skill.

This is because in most situations, redundancy falls during times of economic slowdown, rising unemployment resulting in fewer jobs and greater competition. Labour economists call this an ‘oversupply of labour’ and this will cause an imbalance in the labour market favouring employers. That’s right – employers can pick and chose whomever they like and they know it. I think that competition is a key word here, because just like any other competitive scenario, nobody remembers who came second.

Your job search knowledge must consist of the following areas of competence:

  1. Ability to tap into the hidden job market
  2. Successful behavioural interview skills
  3. Good letter writing ability with a marketable resume
  4. Strong belief in yourself and mental stamina.

Successful job search skills knowledge is critical and my book focuses heavily on this key area. I have covered all of the above areas of competence in separate chapters so that you can easily move from one key activity to another. Your ability to network with others and perform well at interviews will be paramount.

Your ability to write good covering letters and have a well-written up-to-date resume is equally important.

Strong Financial Management Initiatives

Key Success Factor Number 2

Money management is certainly an area of great stress during redundancy or loss of job. This is because your comfort zone has been taken away from you. The weekly or fortnightly pay you have relied upon is no longer there and you are concerned about where your next pay is coming from. I have seen this scenario cause great stress to people with debts, mortgages, and young families particularly where there is only a single income earner.

I have always felt a correlation with money management and the ability to focus on getting a job. If you can take the pressure of monetary matters away from you for a short time then your ability to focus on job hunting improves significantly. The distraction of money worries does not help you focus on interview performance and getting that job. You may become desperate and make the wrong career move in the name of security. You must focus on managing your money immediately after a job loss and here are 10 financial tips to get you started:

  1. Speak to your bank about lowering your mortgage repayments immediately. You will find that over the years you have probably increased your repayments either deliberately or through interest rate reductions. Pay the minimum amount possible for now and forget about paying your house off sooner. That is not a priority now and you must review your financial objectives.
  2. With your redundancy payment pay-off credit card debt either in part or full and decrease the number of bills and interest you must pay monthly.
  3. Eliminate all unnecessary spending. All those nice things to have such as pay television, domestic servants, magazine subscriptions and memberships should be reviewed.
  4. If you have money tied up in investments such as shares or fixed interest term deposits, withdraw this money either in part or full and create a buffer zone for emergencies. Hold this money in an everyday ‘at call’ account for psychological security. This buffer zone will make you feel more secure and comfortable and allow you to focus on job hunting.
  5. Watch your spending and don’t behave as though you are still employed. This is the toughest part because it involves changing your lifestyle and habits. Holidays, clothes and any other regular purchases such as household items and entertainment expenses must be slashed. Believe me, they are not important now and you will survive until things are back on track again.
  6. Be economical with controllable household utilities expenses such as gas, electricity, telephone and your food budget. I managed to save $150 a month on food for my family by just watching for price specials, comparing prices and being more selective.
  7. Create a strict budget that is achievable and try to work within it. It will help you stick to targets and operate within set budget guidelines.
  8. Apply for social security payments. The money will not be enough to live on but it will stretch your savings further buying you more time for job search.
  9. If your finances become too tight prepare to refinance your home as the last resort. Again, this is not a preferred option but the key to job success is time.
  10. Talk about the prospects of borrowing money from family only if necessary. You will need a very supportive family for this and be prepared to pay them back when you get a job.

Flexible and Open Career Re-Assessment

Key Success Factor Number 3

My advice in this instance is get out of your comfort zone whatever you do! Too many people I have helped in their career transition have hindered their job search prospects by sticking to old beliefs and methods of approach. It has to do with familiarity and what people know best, a type of comfort zone holding you prisoner within an electric fence. Once you have lost your job your life will change from despair to opportunity.

I say this because it’s a perfect opportunity to try something new and different. That’s right, you have nothing to lose now and you can experiment and try new ideas and concepts. Stretch yourself and become excited with the thought that everything you have always dreamed of doing outside your steady and regular job has now arrived. It is time to try to test new ideas, experiment with new concepts or see where your hobbies will take you. I commenced writing my book to keep me busy when I lost my job.

Key success factor 3 is about open career re-assessment. To sit down and analyse your career options carefully rather than focusing on getting back to your regular day job or profession that you have been working for so many years.

It is time for a break and a re-assessment of your career wants and needs. In this book I dedicate a chapter to career options. I recommended that you consider a variety of options such as:

  • Starting your own business or franchise
  • Developing a new concept, idea or invention
  • Consider going back to school and undertaking further studies
  • Develop your hobbies into a potential income source
  • Try a new career in a totally different industry and/or profession
  • Take a sabbatical and enjoy the beautiful pleasures of the world.

Whatever you decide to do, flexibility in thought and total career re-assessment will enable you to increase your options in life. When you are in career transition mode I can easily teach you job search skills and how to apply them, however, your view on life and how you exercise your career options is a thought process that only you can act upon. Life is all about increasing your options and then picking the best one for yourself.

Don’t limit yourself when you lose your job, open yourself to all possibilities and explore your opportunities to their fullest. Would you believe I was motivated to write this book when I was between jobs? I had always wanted to write a book about assisting others achieve better employment prospects but I always thought it too hard and time-consuming.

The truth was that I had never written anything substantial before and just the thought of commencing it made me feel uncomfortable. I had some spare time up my sleeve and I decided to give it a try, each day I wrote two or three pages and my intensity and confidence grew each time. I also enjoyed it immensely and thought about writing as a new career. I reassessed my career options and was willing to try and experience other things, so can you!

Mental Toughness and a Strong Belief System

Key Success Factor Number 4

Losing your job is one of the toughest events that can happen to you in life. All of a sudden your standard of living, prosperity and your perception of yourself is challenged. Not easy thoughts to deal with on a daily basis.

If you have a family with young children and a mortgage like the majority of us, then matters can get worse because others dear to you and reliant upon your steady employment are also affected. There is nothing like coming home to your partner and informing them you no longer have a suitable job and watching their jaw drop all the way to the ground in a split second.

I learned very quickly that being sorry for myself was not going to help me and what had happened in my previous job was over and done with. I could not change the past but I could ensure that the present and future be better managed with a new way of thinking. The best way to get another job is to stay focused and challenged, to be mentally tough. If you cannot do this for yourself then do it for your loved ones who rely on you. Many authors describe this situation of downward spiralling anxiety and depression as ‘learned helplessness’. You believe that no matter what you do, nothing can help you out of your current situation, and that you are destined for doom and failure.

This is not true, learned helplessness will not get you another job, but mental toughness and a strong belief in yourself and your abilities will. All situations are temporary and you are just entering a trough in your life cycle. Soon it will get better and you will enter a resurgent growth stage and rise towards a new peak in your life.

However, you must believe in your abilities strongly because your belief system will control your thoughts and actions. A belief is nothing more than a feeling of certainty about what something means to you. In this book we discuss belief systems in more detail and expose how you can better control your beliefs towards positive thinking. These are beliefs that can help provide you with energy and a form of mental toughness to keep you going in a positive direction.

Managing Your Current Job

Key Success Factor Number 5

I have made it very clear in my book that good jobs are hard to find today and that the oversupply of good candidates ensures that employers have the upper hand at recruitment. This is what we are dealing with in the new millennium and sometimes we may lose sight of this and feel that the grass is greener on the other side.

Working as a professional employee relations practitioner for many years, I have seen many people leave good jobs simply because they were not good at managing or keeping their current employment. I don’t mean that you should give up better opportunities, far from it. I am referring to those who have left their employment in difficult circumstances or were not entirely happy with their workplace circumstances at the time. It is easier for us to lose our composure rather than think a situation through rationally during difficult circumstances.

The grass is not always greener on the other side. All businesses have their political issues, difficult people to get along with and peculiarities that don’t always make sense, and perhaps, some companies are more prone to this than other. The key is to better manage your career and your job whereas you can rationally think through those difficult moments and ensure you continue to maintain positive relationships in the workplace. All things pass in life and sometimes it may be nothing more than a difficult phase the company is going through. If you are being counselled for poor performance, have a hard look at yourself and determine whether there is genuinely room for improvement.

You may find that you can turn it around with a dedicated personal approach and commitment. If someone is making your life miserable focus on better managing others in the workplace and see if you can change the situation by adopting new and different strategies to better manage this person. There are many courses, books and mentors in the workplace that can assist you overcome difficult situations through their own experiences.